CAFOD Romero Retreat

CAFOD Romero Retreat

Saturday 18th November at Wardley Hall, Salford

 

The Romero Retreat, held in the beautiful surroundings of Wardley Hall, official residence of the Bishop of Salford, on Saturday 18th November, was attended by over 30 people from all the dioceses of the North West of England: Lancaster, Liverpool, Salford and Shrewsbury. It enabled us, the participants, to learn and reflect on how the life and work of Archbishop Oscar Romero was transformed in the three short years of his ministry as Archbishop of San Salvador from a shy priest, suspicious of the Church’s involvement in social action, to the tireless fighter for justice and voice of the voiceless martyred on 24th March 1980. We saw how this transformation occurred through his encounters with suffering, the people and with God and we thought about our own lives and how we could follow his example.

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The day began and ended with thought provoking group liturgy and in between there was time for group discussion and personal reflection as well as the opportunity to talk informally with others over tea and coffee as well as a magnificent shared lunch.

It was a most enjoyable and beneficial day. Thank you to the CAFOD Campaigns team for organising it.

 

Thank you to Justine, CAFOD Liverpool’s Education Volunteer Co-Ordinator for writing the above reflection.

CAFOD’s World Gifts Are Back!

CAFOD’s World Gifts are back again this Christmas, but what are “World Gifts”?

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“World Gifts are a range of virtual charity gifts that will delight the people you give them to and help transform the lives of poor communities and families in developing countries.”

World Gifts make a real and long lasting difference to the communities which receive them, such as Sindhupalchowk District in Nepal, where the 2015 earthquake meant that 89 per cent of school classrooms were destroyed or made unsafe. As well as dealing with the devastation of their homes and the loss of family members, children like Nirjala risked losing the opportunity to go to school. But thanks to supporters buying World Gifts, CAFOD are helping to rebuild 34 schools.

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There’s a variety of gifts, including “Trees for life“, “The pig that provides“, “The goat that gives” “The net that protects“, “Teach Someone to Read“, a “Community Toilet“, “Build a Greenhouse“, “Drought Resistant Crops“, a “School starter pack” or a “Birth Certificate” and much much more, with a variety of prices to suit all budgets, with free delivery on all gifts.

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You can buy your World Gift, or find out more information at worldgifts.cafod.org.uk or you can order by phone calling CAFOD World Gifts on 0808 14 000 14

Creation Time Resource a Hit!

4th October marked the end of Creation Time, which began on 1st September. In his encyclical letter, Laudato Si’, Pope Francis urges us to review how we live in the face of the damage being done to our planet, now and in the future, through climate change. He reminds us that the consequences of climate change will affect us all, but will be worst for those in the poorer parts of the world, who have not only done the least to cause the problem but have also benefited least from the changes which have caused it.

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The Creation Time Resource

CAFOD and the Liverpool Archdiocese Justice and Peace Commission have created a second resource for Creation Time, which gives parishes and other groups the opportunity to reflect on the Gospel readings for Creation Time in terms of Laudato Si’. This wonderful resource consists of gospel readings for the Sundays throughout Creation Time, excerpts from Laudato Si’, stories to illustrate some of the issues, prayers and some challenging questions for discussion. The aim is to help us to become better informed and to use this knowledge to work towards combating climate change, its causes and its consequences, just as Pope Francis has urged.

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A poster showing information about the resource and sessions

Several parishes have participated in this year’s Creation Time, and have had some fantastic sessions following the resource. The resource has had some really positive feedback from the parish groups that have used it this year, especially from St Wilfrid’s in Widnes. Pauline Rolt, CAFOD volunteer, used the resource with members of the bible group, she said “most of the group have never used this type of resource before and they’ve really enjoyed it”. There was also plenty of positive feedback from other members of the group, with Mary describing the resource as “very good, thought provoking as it encourages open discussion, especially on today’s world”. Phil added, “It dovetails in well with our LiveSimpy initiative… I was drawn to go to the LiveSimply launch evening having participated in the Creation Time reflections”. Jean agreed, saying “We want more!”

The sessions themselves have also been particularly successful and the resulting discussions have prompted deeper considerations for the environment; following the sessions at St Edmunds, Sheila Cogley, CAFOD Volunteer, said “We are going to put a practical hint/Eco Tip into the newsletter over the coming weeks, for example this week’s will be to sign the Power to Be cards which we’re handing out”. She added, “We have found the materials to be very good at leading us through the issuesCreat time from a number of different perspectives and as to be expected our discussions have also branched out according to individual’s knowledge and experiences.”

 

More positive feedback came from Peter and Julie Galloway, who arranged sessions at St Joseph’s in Leigh. The sessions were promoted to the parish by Fr Colin during mass and held weekly. Peter said “In the first session we spent a long time on reflecting on the gospel, and had a brief discussion about food and meat, before enjoying the closing prayer”. He concluded that throughout the sessions, the group “spent much time on gratitude for what we do have and we will all try to implement the action.” They have also sent a follow-up email to Michael Gove and to the local Council to encourage greater recycling of plastic.

Steve Atherton, the Justice and Peace Fieldworker for the Liverpool Archdiocese said “we recieved very positive evaluations from the St John’s group including “Thought provoking … Challenging … It helped to make us more conscious of the damage we do to the world … Encouraged me to find out more … The prayers are quite beautiful … Reinforces the idea that we are stewards … We need to develop habits of care … It’s the poor who always suffer …everything is interconnected and everything has a cost … Brings home individual responsibility and made me think about what we can do by way of shopping, etc … We would like more of the same.”

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Details of the follow up meeting!

Following on from previous Creation Time courses, participants from all over the Archdiocese were keen to share their experiences of using the resource, and to exchange ideas for the next resource. This year there will be a follow up meeting for everyone who has taken part in the course. This will be held on 28th October 2017, 11am – 1.30pm at St Anne’s Church, Overbury Street, Liverpool L7 3HJ and there will be a shared lunch at the end. If you have taken part in Creation Time please do come along and share your ideas and food in a simple meal, everyone is welcome!

For more information please contact Steve on 0151 522 1080, or Ged on 0151 228 4028.

The Church taking action and Christian life in the Philippines

Today’s my first day back in the CAFOD Liverpool Volunteer Centre after our trip to the Philippines.  This is my fourth blog and I want to say something about how our partners NASSA/Caritas Philippines (NASSA for short) and the Church is working to enable people and the planet to have a more sustainable future.  I’ll try and give a brief outline of how the Church is already responding to social concerns, based on its structures, what its potential is to make further improvements and the directions it seeks to take.  Once again, these are just the impressions I’ve received from what we’ve witnessed heard from others there.

Church-sponsored Social Action work operates at all levels (local/parish, diocesan and national).  Throughout this work, like a thread through their lives, people expect and plan for coping with natural disasters (earthquakes, typhoons, landslides, floods, volcanic eruptions, etc.).  On Palm Sunday, they collect money and keep some for local development work (helping people make their lives better), put some aside for emergencies (typhoons, earthquakes, etc.) and send some to NASSA to provide support to the whole church and respond where the local Church can’t cope.  Typhoons are an example and the recent ones have been so damaging that even the local and national support wasn’t enough so other Caritas agencies like CAFOD came to help.

blog 4 .1A great example of people coping with such circumstances was in Pasig south of Manila where Fr Errol is the PP of a parish of 20,000.  We were there at a survey meeting with NASSA staff to find out where local people need most training to cope with the next major shock.  They already know they are OK at dealing with floods because four years ago, heavy rains on the Sierra Madre Mountains became an 8-foot torrent around the church.  Huge amounts of damage.  People now have an evacuation drill worked out and practise it regularly so NASSA will help train local people to deal with earthquakes instead.  To cope with such events, Fr Errol has setting up local Basic Ecclesial Communities (BECs) of 15-20 families each.  The Groups meet weekly and pray but they are also dealing with the issues of their lives.  He meets monthly with representatives from each BEC and visits the BECs on a rolling programme too.  This is a growing model – in 2017 people are more focussed on parishes becoming “communities of communities.” NASSA is keen to encourage parishes and BECs to go beyond emergency relief and support one another on a more regular basis, responding to needs as local people see it.  NASSA work largely through their local diocesan Social Action Centres who support such developments, some more strongly than others.  In my first blog, I mentioned the work of Lipa Archdiocese’s Social Action Centre nearby (LASAC) as a strong example.  This idea of small communities is at the heart of the Self-Help Group Programme in the Lipa area where women cluster together and save a little money each week in a credit union.  On the back of this a massive movement has quickly grown with four towns covered by their own network of such groups in depth.  These networks in clusters and in larger federations advocate for political change as well as basic community and economic development.  The Groups design and lead the new developments.

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Florenzio, right, whose nickname is Entoy

We heard about the need for this approach too from Environmentalist Florenzio from Sorsogon Diocese.  When we were looking at the world stats, he was not only familiar with the international picture of poverty, inequality and power as we looked at the world map but also knew well the local position too.  His group have completed a local audit and had a map as part of the planning for emergency relief led by NASSA across the country.  He knew where the people who didn’t have toilets (or latrines) were, those who didn’t have running water, and about child health concerns for under 5s.  Fishermen and farmers were the poorest he told me and his greatest concern was for the environmental damage in fishing and the dumping of waste by people.  He struck me with his quiet and deep commitment to improving the lot of farmers and fishermen who struggle with poor conditions, low wages and the poisoning and dynamiting of fish stocks with poor support for their rights from the Government.  He had nearly been shot in defence of local people and told me calmly and matter-of-factly that he was ready to die for what he believed in, the beauty of the earth and the needs of the poor, and was proud of the involvement of the Church in this.

When I asked him what he hoped for from the day, he quietly thought for a moment and, reverting to his own language, simply said, “Bayanihan!”  This means “spirit of cooperation”, a term Filipinos have coined from a practical example.  Many people live in houses which need to be more mobile than we are used to because of the natural hazards they face.  When someone needs to move, they often literally move their house on poles too. This takes a great deal of effort from a team of people and this practice is used to encapsulate the spirit of cooperation.

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Typical Bayanihan hut

We saw a wonderful Church-sponsored rice growing project in the north.  317 rice farmers have grouped together through the Social Action Centre to form an organic cooperative.  Tatay (“Grandad”) Ben, deeply respected we were told by the farmers, tests the farms for artificial fertilisers and encourages people to stay in the scheme.  He told me that unless something was done to protect the land, it would become exhausted in 40 years with over-farming and climate change.  You can see in his hands a sample of the organic fertiliser they have developed which is like rocket fuel for rice!  He was another who calmly spoke his truth to us, cradling the soil in his hands – it was part of him – all the time we were speaking with him.

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Tatay Ben with finished organic fertiliser

I also met resistance to taking social action.  A young man told me earnestly about the wonderful BECs (6 in his parish) and it was early days.  The Groups were focussed on prayer activity so far with a 2-hour Bible study a day.  However, he was reluctant to get involved in social action: “The rich have more and they should give more!  We will pray!”  Some we used in the training, such as the Lampedusa Cross Service, encouraged people not only to pray but to find out about the world, to share their concerns from compassion and to consider taking action.  While he has a good point, we hoped he too would put his shoulder to the wheel after the training!

And he does have a point about the rich of course.  CAFOD’s work in the Philippines is now at an end – for the moment at least as we need to focus scarce resources on other nations.  NASSA are trying to become more independent of foreign aid and engage more people in social action and supporting their local people but I also learnt this from Analyn, NASSA’s community worker: 76% of the $13bn annual income in the Philippines is in the hands of just 40 families.

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Forbes Magazine 2011

This means that the other 104,000,000 people have only 24% of the wealth of the nation to keep them going, which was only $3.75 Billion around $36.06 per person per year.  That’s not CAFOD being mean or tired – if we had more, we could give more to more partners.  It’s simple: other nations need our support even more.  The Church in the Philippines, who also gave to the people of Nepal in the 2015 earthquake, are trying to share their resources better and encourage more people to make their voices heard in favour of the poor.

Find out more about the work CAFOD does in the Philippines. 

Ged in the Philippines: Training volunteers for social action

Ged’s message this week comes from the Alay Kapwa programme in Manila, Philippines.

The reason David, Maggie and I are in the Philippines is to help our partner NASSA/Caritas Philippines (NASSA for short) help the church here do two things.

Firstly, train community leaders to engage and work with volunteers in their area in social action and secondly help the Church make their response to social concerns more sustainable financially with less dependence on international aid.  The second aim is good in that it encourages self-reliance, though, in our experience here, there is little sign of that missing!  In almost every encounter we are touched not only by the strength of the spirit of people here but also with the groundedness and cheerfulness of those we meet.  As a nation, they take this approach too; on Friday, the electricity supplies throughout metro-Manila for over 11 million people will be cut as they practise an earthquake drill, preparing for the “Big One” they know is coming.  The threat is real alright; even their Cathedral for example has been destroyed five times by earthquakes.  Last year they had 60.  In Tacloban yesterday a 6.9 quake struck the city (in earlier plans we would have been there then!).

On top of having to deal with the daily struggles of life, 104m people live on land and near the seas which can hurl such immense forces at them as well.  Surprisingly, this does not seem to teach them paralysing fear but deep respect for the earth and one another, and they are better at not holding onto things which are not permanent, even their cities (families are different of course).

So, what comes across is not so much that they should cope on their own but the inequality of the distribution of the world’s resources, particularly in such circumstances.  But the Philippines is no social paradise.  Although its annual income as a nation is small, still 76% of it goes to a very few people at the “top” (Japan’s figure is 2.8% by the way).  150,000 families here own more than the poorest 6 million.  3.8 million people are living on less than £4.70 a day for all their food and non-food needs.

The solution? Pope Francis says: “Without a solution to the problems of the poor, we will not solve the problems of the world. We need projects, mechanisms and processes to implement better distribution of resources, from the creation of new jobs to the integral promotion of those who are excluded.”   Even the World Bank agrees with this.  But locally, what can they do?  As Pope Francis says, “This concern for the poor is in the Gospel, it is within the tradition of the Church.”

I mentioned in the last blog that NASSA collect money to support the Church’s social action work on Palm Sunday each year in a programme called Alay Kapwa.  NASSA want to expand this so that the message of Alay Kapwa (offer help to your neighbour based on Mt 25:40) is more prominent in the Church’s life throughout the year.  CAFOD’s Fast Days are similar, highpoints in our compassionate response. Alay Kapwa is designed to, “contribute to the struggle for genuine development.  It aims to address 4 basic challenges of the Philippine Church:

  • Split-level (people saying they care and not caring too much in practice)
  • Inequality: see above
  • Fragmentation: providing a focus for parishes improves engagement
  • Dependency: see above

The money is raised goes to fund development work, works of mercy and works of justice: advocacy,” (source: NASSA).

With CAFOD, we learn and give but we take action during the year too through campaigning like with the Power to Be Campaign at the moment (if you haven’t taken part, please do!).  And we also pray, engaging one another, hearing the concerns of our sisters and brothers and, in that place in our hearts where God is, choosing to say yes or no; do we respond this time or not?

Well, that’s why we are helping people do by training people to recruit and manage volunteers in their parishes here to grow Alay Kapwa.  At our first two-day workshop, we trained 25 leading volunteers in San Jose (St Joseph’s) Diocese using CAFOD’s resources David had adapted as much as possible for the Philippines.  It’s fantastic to put all of this together – we should do this at home too!  Underneath it all is Catholic Social Teaching and the Pastoral Cycle process: See, judge, act – and celebrate!  The people who came were all parish volunteers or workers, leaders of Basic Ecclesial Communities, the groups of which the parishes are composed.  Most of the parishes in the Philippines give to the Alay Kapwa campaign and we talked about how to engage people so that they want to give as a response locally, nationally and indeed internationally (the Church here gave money to help people in Nepal after the terrible 2015 earthquake).

We started with World Statistics Icebreaker to engage people in social concerns.  In managing volunteers, we focused on how to find and sustain volunteers and, in particular, how to use and develop their own resources which we’ve used in our work with schools.  For example, the Life Without Taps Game which highlights life and death issues related to the most basic need, water.  We led them in prayer using the Lampedusa Cross Pilgrimage with its focus on the experience of refugees and into basic campaigning with the Power to Be Campaign liturgy where participants are invited in both cases to take action to address injustice and support the poor through prayer.  We used films (for example on Catholic Social Teaching) and supplemented this with a simple card exercise.  We also focused on the importance of child protection to ensure the most vulnerable are safe within their own communities while acting for the Church and on thanking volunteers for their support.

The reaction?  NASSA staff are pleased with it and the lively responses from participants whom they see as “stirred up.”

More on this in our next epic instalment!

For now, thanks for your attention!